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By TomGhoulery
Posts:  6
Joined:  Mon Feb 26, 2024 4:27 pm
#447421
I’m new to carnivorous plants, and I got my sundew around a month and a half ago. I read it should start producing dew after a few weeks, but nothings happened yet. I did a bit of research why, and the likely answer is that my house isn’t humid. So I researched all these different ways to increase humidity. I gave it a little pebble tray, and surrounded it with some other plants. But still, it won’t grow dew. So that’s the first question, what else could/should I do to make it grow dew? Second of all, I think it somehow caught something anyway???? I looked at it the other day, and it seems to have caught a little fly. I don’t know how this is possible. Other than that, it seems to be growing as normal. There’s new growth coming from the middle and around it. Any advice?
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By ChefDean
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Joined:  Tue Sep 18, 2018 12:44 am
#447422
Sundews can pout for a long time after changing environments, but should have started to come around after six weeks. Typically, if they're not producing dew, it's either not enough light or water. Humidity isn't too much of a factor.
Assuming it's in the proper media and pot, with low mineral water in a shallow plastic dish without the pebbles, put it on a sunny windowsill. You could also put it outside in bright, indirect light, as long as the temperature doesn't get more than about 85°F.
However, a pic of the plant could help us see if there may be other factors affecting it.
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By Gary
Posts:  464
Joined:  Fri Jul 08, 2022 3:23 pm
#447424
I had a similar problem with my first Cape. I tried lots of ways to raise humidity around the plant, misted it several times a day (not really a good idea), all to no avail. Sunlight, and lots of it, will fix your issue. You may need to be careful at first so the leaves don't burn, but after my dry Capes got in the sun they were drowning in dew.

Edit: ChefDean posted his comment as I was typing. Definitely good advice there. And yes, a pic would help.
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By Intheswamp
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Joined:  Wed May 04, 2022 2:28 pm
#447438
The dew isn't really dependent on humidity, it is actually a nectar of sorts used to entice poor little innocent bugs to come check it out. Poor, poor little bugs. :cry: :mrgreen: I think what you need to do if "up" your light level. Either move it closer to your grow light, give it a longer photo period (more light hours), or if you're growing outdoors be sure it's where it can get at get 6 or more hours of sunlight. Of course make sure it has plenty of water...that's kind of different from having a high humidity level. Plenty of water and lots of light should give you dew. What the above posters mentioned are important...proper grow mix and low-TDS water (distilled water, rain water, RO water).

What kind of sundew is it? Growing conditions? Just a "tweak" of something and it'll be dazzling I betcha!!!!
And, I agree again with the comments about a picture...they help a lot whole lot. But, those poor, poor bugs don't want you to post one so they may plot against you to prevent you posting one. ;)
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By Panman
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Joined:  Wed Mar 04, 2020 8:41 pm
#447439
If you recently got the plant, it will pout for at least 1 month. Watch the new leaves. If they are opening without dew, then there is a problem. Otherwise, it will just take time to settle in.
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By Intheswamp
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Joined:  Wed May 04, 2022 2:28 pm
#447441
The "pouting". Yes, they can cop an attitude. The last "new" capensis that I got was from hollyhock, it was an "All Red" that she nicknamed "Beet" because of it's deep red color. It looked really bad when I first got it, just a little dew on a leaf or two. Then some leaves started dying/blackening. Then the live leaves started putting on a little more dew. More leaves died. New growth started. Now all the leaves are looking good and covered with dew. Probably took ~two months for it to sort things out. ;)
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By TomGhoulery
Posts:  6
Joined:  Mon Feb 26, 2024 4:27 pm
#447443
UPDATE:
Thanks everyone for the replies/advice! Some people said a picture would be helpful, so I’ve attached one this time! For some further context, there’s a window on the opposite side of the room, which lets in plenty of sun. A lot of the house plants in my house (I live with my mom) are in this room because of it. I water it distilled water every couple days, with small amounts in frequent bursts like that. Hopefully these details can help! I’ve attached a photo, but I’m still learning how this site works so it might not work.
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By Intheswamp
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Joined:  Wed May 04, 2022 2:28 pm
#447446
A warning here...I'm no expert, I just post a lot. ;) I've only been tinkering with CPs for a little under two years.

Does it get any DIRECT sunlight?(I see wcrosman beat me to that). If so, how many hours? The plant looks pretty healthy, though possibly a bit etiolated.

Is the pot sitting *in* water, rather than above the water? I keep mine in water 95% of the time. I'd probably have that plant and pot sitting in 3/4" of water, let it dry down, stay dry for a day or two and then bring the water level back up. Sporadic top-watering is good for rinsing the grow mix and pulling oxygen down into it...I'd dump the drain water after top-watering and refill with fresh water (prevents mineral build-up).

"...window on the opposite side of the room..." does not instill a sense of, well, good lighting. This looks like a capensis to me. Capes come from South Africa growing from ocean level to a mile high on mountainsides in very clear, sunny skies. They are not your typical houseplants and have needs different from a spider plant or a philodendron. Move them over to those windows so they can hopefully get some direct light. Another question is....which direction do the windows face? East, south, and west are good...north, not so good.

One last thing. The ceramic dishes can be "iffy" for carnivorous plants. As long as they're fully glazed it shouldn't be a problem but if there are un-glazed areas that are in contact with the water or grow mix then they can leach minerals out that could harm the plants.
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By Fishkeeper
Posts:  792
Joined:  Sat Dec 03, 2016 10:59 pm
#447458
I'd agree; likely both too little light and too little water. Put it directly on the windowsill, and keep it in a shallow dish of water at all times. They like to be constantly moist-to-wet, and need plenty of bright light. Low humidity is often fine for capensis as long as the roots get plenty of water.
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By TomGhoulery
Posts:  6
Joined:  Mon Feb 26, 2024 4:27 pm
#447467
UPDATE PT 2
Thanks again for the advice everyone! I’m at school right now, but I’ll move the sundew closer to the window/in more direct sunlight when I get home today. And it’s surprising to me that I seem to be watering it too little, I was worried I might be overwatering it! Thanks again!
By Fishkeeper
Posts:  792
Joined:  Sat Dec 03, 2016 10:59 pm
#447505
I had Cape sundews growing in 4" pots sat in 2" of water for awhile. Sundews are mostly bog plants, and Capes in particular tolerate, or outright like, even more moisture than others do. I'd wager it's lack of water that has yours not showing dew.
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By StephenB200+
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Joined:  Sun Feb 24, 2019 9:01 pm
#447519
Maybe as soon as you can, get them outdoors. My Capes thrive when they’re outdoors, they grow, flower and divide non stop.
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By Panman
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Joined:  Wed Mar 04, 2020 8:41 pm
#447521
StephenB200+ wrote: Wed Feb 28, 2024 11:56 am Maybe as soon as you can, get them outdoors. My Capes thrive when they’re outdoors, they grow, flower and divide non stop.
That all depends on where you live. In Georgia, the sun absolutely fries my capes if I put them outside. For me, they preferred the east window. But like I said the Georgia sun is very intense, even through a window.
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